Agelasto Trustee Select Papers – Letter 6 (Redacted)

Agelasto Trustee Select Papers_Letter 6_Redacted

This letter sent to Trustee Agelasto (incorrectly spelled Agelastro in the letter) discusses strong disdain toward to idea to making W&L coeducational. The author provides three suggestions:

  1. The author proposes “and will be the first to volunteer to contribute, that a one-way ticket back to Lapeer, Michigan, be immediately purchased for Dr. Wilson.”
  2. The author states that the “faculty has put itself on a pedestal and wants to dictate the University’s policies.”
  3. The Board of Trustees should be told that coeducation is very unpopular.

This letter is among the most intense wording among any letter in the archives. It is attached to a Washington Post article citing the decision to allow women into the University Club of Washington, DC.

Agelasto Trustee Select Papers – Letter 4 and 5 (Redacted)

Agelasto Trustee Select Papers_Letter 4_Redacted

Letter 4

Agelasto Trustee Select Papers_Letter 5_Redacted

Letter 5

Letter 4 is a cover letter to Trustee Agelasto. Letter 5 is written from the same individual as the cover letter and discusses his unhappiness with the way that the coeducation decision has been handled thus far. (It had yet to pass at the time of this writing.) He lists why he believes that W&L should not go coeducational (e.g. alumni were largely ignored, alumni survey was biased, and the institution is not in as bad of academic shape as it asserted. The author concludes by saying his loyal donations may not continue in the same way they have before and questions whether W&L “really values its alumni.”

The Beginning Of An Error

The Beginning of an ErrorMany men were against the allowing of women to attend Washington and Lee University because they both cherished the all-male tradition of the school and thought the lifestyle of the university would take a negative turn. Combined with their shirts, these men pose in front of urinals to show complete disagreement with and disrespect for the coeducation initiative at Washington and Lee.